Region Map / Miramichi Region / Miramichi City / Miramichi Nature Trail

Miramichi Nature Trail

Quick Facts

Ratings Legend

Difficulty Easy Features Marsh
Trail Type Loop Trail Markers None but easy to follow
Distance 1.6 km Scenery Rating Special Features
Estimated Time 45 mins Mainteance Rating Well Maintained
Trail Surface Type Crushed Rock Cell Phone Reception Strong
Elevation Change 8 m GPS file Unavailable at this time


Map

Map Legend


View Miramichi Nature Trail in a larger map

Directions

When coming into Miramichi from the Moncton area on Route 11 you will pass the airport. Just past the airport you will pass Tim Hortons. Turn left on Maher Street just past Tim Hortons. After 1 km the road takes a sharp turn to the right and turns into Ironmen Road. After another 500 meters you will come to a dead end. Park along the road near the dead end. The trail starts on the right just before the dead end.

Coming into Miramichi from the Bathurst area on Route 11 cross the Centennial bridge. After 1.2 km on top of the hill take exit 119 onto Route 8. At the exit turn right on Route 8. After 350 meters turn left onto General Manson Way. After another 150 meters take your first left onto Chapel Road. At the end of Chapel Road turn left onto Ironmen Road and you will see a dead end. Park along the road near the dead end. The trail starts on the right just before the dead end.

Coming into Miramichi from the Fredericton area on Route 8 pass through town and cross Miramichi Bridge. After crossing the bridge continue straight through the set of lights. After 7.4 km the road takes a sharp left turn. Turn right onto General Manson Way on this turn. After another 150 meters take your first left onto Chapel Road. At the end of Chapel Road turn left onto Ironmen Road and you will see a dead end. Park along the road near the dead end. The trail starts on the right just before the dead end.


Trail Description

The trail starts as a small crushed rock path that runs along the back of a field that backs on a residential area. The trail then turns left and goes through a strip of trees to a trail junction. The left is an old trail that is no longer used. The main trail goes to the right along the marsh. Shortly after turning right at the Junction you will come to another junction. From here the trail makes a large figure 8 shape around the open waters of the marsh. There is a lookout cabin with a picnic table near the middle of the figure 8 on the right. Almost across from the cabin is an access trail. The access trail goes through the strip of trees to the field at the back of houses further down from the entrance. There is one more access trail at the north-east end of the figure 8 that goes along another small pond (see map). This access trail is muddier and grown in but eventually comes out further down the field behind the houses. There are several interpretive signs throughout the trails.


From the Sign

Nest Boxes (Cavity nesting duck homes) - Several species of waterfowl including wood ducks, common goldeneye and hooded mergansers nest high up in holes or cavities in trees.

Human impacts on the forest have reduced the availability of suitable trees for nests. Man-made nest boxes can help this problem by increasing the number of available, secure nesting sites.

Besides ducks, other species of songbirds and small mammals may also use artificial nest boxes to raise their young.

Wetlands are valuable wildlife habitat - Canada is home to nearly 25 per cent of the earth's wetlands. These wetlands and their surrounding uplands are habitat for approximately 600 species of plants, animals, and insects, making them almost as productive as tropical rainforests. Mammals, birds, amphibians, reptiles, fish and many invertebrates rely on wetlands for food, water, breeding and nesting grounds, resting areas and shelters. Unfortunately, up to 80 per cent of wetlands have disappeared in urban areas.


Trail History

The marsh and the Miramichi Nature Trail were built by Ducks Unlimited in 2006.


Current Weather


External Links

No Links available at this time.


Trail last visited October 8, 2011.
Page Last Updated April 13, 2013.

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