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Nepisiguit Mi'gmaq Trail

Field Trail

Return to Daly Point

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Walking on the Field Trail

Quick Facts

Difficulty easy
Trail Type linear
Distance 600 m
Estimated Time 15 minutes one way
Surface Type old road, wood chips
Elevation Change 22 meters
Features lookout tower, fields
Trail Markers none but easy to follow
Scenary Rating special features
Maintenance Rating well maintained
Cell Reception strong
Dog Friendly on a leash
Fees donations accepted
GPS File available on request

Description

The Field Trail is the main access trail to all the other trails in the reserve. It bisects the reserve from the visitor centre to the waters edge. The start of the trail is lined with young birch and interpretive signs. The trail is surrounded by an old field that is in various states of being overtaken by bushes.

There is a shelter with benches and a lookout tower along the trail. The lookout tower overlooks a young aspen stand on a hill that descends to Bathurst Bay.

Map

Directions

For directions to the park go to the Daly Point Nature Reserve page.

The Field Trail can be accessed from the visitor centre. This trail is used to access all of the other trails in the park.

From the Sign

The Field Trail

The Field Trail runs through old fields that were farmed for over 300 years but are now reverting to forest. Plant succession takes several years. First grasses and herbaceous plants called "pioneer species" invade the bare ground. Next vines and shrubs take root, followed by pines and hardwoods. Watch for white-tailed deer grazing on a large variety of plants. They prefer a forest with small grassy openings. The patchy edge community is a good place to see warblers, sparrows and other songbirds as there is an abundance of food and nesting places.

From the Sign

What to do if you encounter a bear...

  • When hiking, stay alert and carry noisemakers such as bells or cans with rocks inside.
  • Be especially alert when travelling during strong gusting winds as most animals will not be able to hear or smell you in advance.
  • Always keep young children within sight.
  • If a bear woofs, snaps its jaws, slaps the ground or bush or bluff charges: YOU ARE TOO CLOSE! Back away slowly. Go inside if possible and wait for the bear to leave. Do no let your dog loose.
If a bear refuses to leave:
  • Make loud noise or throw something to scare it away.
  • Speak in a loud voice so that the bear recognizes you as a human. Do not scream, whistle or growl at the bear.
  • Back slowly away from the animal. Do not turn your back and keep bear in sight.
  • If you are alone, raise your arms over your head and slowly wave them to appear larger and therefore more intimidating. If you are in a group, stay together - DON'T SPREAD OUT!
  • Throw rocks or sticks at the animal.
  • DO NOT CLIMB A TREE! All but the heaviest bears can easily climb almost any tree.

Trail Last Hiked: March 25, 2017.

Page Last Updated: Dec. 16, 2018.


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